New York

Artistic Eye

Downsizing from a house to an apartment typically requires the shedding of possessions, from furnishings to books and artwork. But for Jackie Chalkley and her husband, C. Wayne Callaway, moving from their modern, architect-designed home in Woodley Park to a two-bedroom condominium in Wesley Heights meant renovating to accommodate all their favorite belongings without overwhelming the smaller space.
Chalkley, once a potter, is best known for her three eponymous fashion boutiques in Washington, DC, that pioneered the wearable art concept. She closed those businesses in 1999 and has recently turned her artistic eye to interior design. “I’ve always worked with design in terms of products and presentation, so it wasn’t new for me to think about it in terms of space and planning,” she says, noting a current project she has undertaken to update the public spaces of the 1970s building where she and Callaway live.
Chalkley oversaw the renovation of their two-level condo, transforming outdated interiors that had “wallpaper on every single surface,” she recalls, into clean-lined, open spaces. She and her husband purchased the apartment in 2013, drawn by elements similar to those in their previous home, including floor-to-ceiling windows, a generous outdoor terrace and balconies off the upper level.
Playing up those assets, Chalkley streamlined the main level to create a seamless living/dining suite that opens through expansive glass doors and windows to an outdoor room. “There wasn’t a rhythm or flow to the space, so that was the first thing I struggled with,” she says. “The terrace makes the interior space feel bigger and serves as another living area in warm weather.”
Chalkley also added built-in storage and shelving in nearly every room; the units eliminate clutter and leave plenty of space to display paintings, prints and sculpture. “I wanted the design to be very minimalist with specific places for our artwork,” she says.
On the living room wall next to the seating area, vertically slatted piers conceal a china closet and a heating/cooling unit. They also frame a niche that showcases a large painting by the late New York artist David Shapiro. The arrangement is repeated on the opposite wall of the dining area to set off a cluster of earth-daubed paintings by New York artist Alan Sonfist.
Sofas, chairs and lamps are by French designer Christian Liaigre, whose projects include the Mercer Hotel in New York. “His pieces are beautifully proportioned and unpretentious,” notes Chalkley. “They are contemporary in an understated, classic way.”
Although the ceiling height in the apartment is only eight feet, the owner installed tall ficus trees and a pair of wooden ladders from Mali in the living area. “They lend verticality to the space, almost in a way that defies the height limitation,” she explains.
To save costs, Chalkley overhauled the kitchen with IKEA cabinets but splurged on high-end appliances and marble countertops. A tiny breakfast nook with a table and a banquette is tucked in between the cabinets, and even this small space incorporates artwork: a print by Spanish artist Antoni Tàpies.
Next to the kitchen, the staircase leading to the upper level was remodeled with a simple enclosure and dark-stained wood treads that echo the flooring on the main level for visual continuity. A multi-piece sculpture by Washington, DC, artist Yuriko Yamaguchi serves to anchor the transitional space.
In the hallway leading to the two bedrooms on the upper floor, Chalkley moved a door to make room for another art wall, now filled by two Shapiro paintings. She created an office space within the guest room by mounting IKEA shelving to display books and objects from her boutiques, and installing the custom walnut desk created by Washington, DC, designer Thomas Pheasant for her previous residence. Facing the desk, photographs by Linda Connor hang in a grid pattern. In the adjacent master bedroom, IKEA cabinet doors were cut down to create a headboard, and twin portraits by Paris-based painter James Brown were mounted above the bed.
Renovating and repurposing the belongings from her previous home has been a valuable experience for Chalkley. As she reflects, “This downsizing project has given me insights that should be useful to my clients who are facing similar transitions going forward.”
Writer Deborah K. Dietsch is based in Washington, DC. Maxwell MacKenzie is a photographer in Washington, DC.
INTERIOR DESIGN: JACKIE CHALKLEY, Jackie Chalkley, Washington, DC.

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Ellen Manderfield’s Sincere Approach

In 1987 Ellen Manderfield wrote, “There is much to be said for the industrial design profession, and there is room for the feminine touch—with a sincere approach and the right attitude, one can go far.” A “sincere approach” might be a bit of an understatement when describing Manderfield’s almost 50-year-long career. As a pioneering American designer who produced hundreds upon hundreds of commercial product designs, she was also highly skilled, focused and, above all, ambitious. Ellen Manderfield at work in the Montgomery Ward Bureau of Design, 1950. From the Design Archives of the Chicago AthenaeumAs a child, Manderfield was an aspiring furniture designer, and although she joined her father in woodworking projects, he steered her away from what was thought of as an unladylike profession and instead urged her into the commercial arts. After completing her studies at Mundelein College of Loyola University in 1939, Manderfield worked as a graphic and packaging designer at Meyercord Company in Chicago before switching to the industrial design field in 1944 with a job at the Colonial Radio Corporation (later known as Sylvania Electric) in Buffalo, New York. As supervisor of the styling department, she oversaw a staff of seven, designing televisions, record players and radios. In 1947 she returned to Chicago, briefly designing appliances for George McStay Jackson before moving on to a position in Anne Swainson’s Bureau of Design at Montgomery Ward. She would stay for four years, designing numerous household goods and appliances under Swainson’s watchful eye. Records from her time at the bureau reveal her great range, with Manderfield producing designs for toasters, metal vices, air conditioners, coffee makers, arc welders, accordions, bathroom fixtures and more.Drawing for a Montgomery Ward toaster, 1942. From the Design Archives of the Chicago Athenaeum Drawing for a Montgomery Ward semi-steel pipe and garage vice. From the Design Archives of the Chicago Athenaeum Ellen Manderfield–designed Montgomery Ward automatic coffee maker, 1950. From the Design Archives of the Chicago Athenaeum A position with General Electric in Syracuse would bring her back to upstate New York, where she designed radio and television cabinets from 1951–56. Manderfield would switch jobs only one more time, joining Oneida Ltd. Silversmiths in 1956 and staying until her retirement in 1986 as a senior designer. In those 30 years she designed over 200 silver and stainless-steel flatware patterns, in addition to hollowware, plastic dishware and giftware. Ellen Manderfield technical drawing for a hurricane lamp, 1984. Oneida Ltd.Rendered drawing for a hurricane lamp, 1984. Oneida Ltd. At Oneida she worked closely with design director Frank Perry to produce a number of best-selling designs, including the flatware lines Omni and Michelangelo. Oneida's current design director, Paul Gebhardt, notes that Manderfield and Perry’s design process was extremely rigorous—for a single teaspoon in the Michelangelo line, for example, they “looked at a minimum of 20 versions of the teaspoon to get the balance and flow just right.” From there, Gebhardt relates, technical drawings of the teaspoon would be drafted and a 250-percent-scale model would be created in clay and then in plaster, in order to tool the intricate patterns. The final model would be used with a reducing mill to create master tools for the spoon. Set of Michelangelo flatware for Oneida Ltd. Shortly after joining Oneida, Manderfield became the first female member of the IDSA (then known as the American Society of Industrial Designer)—and in 1992 she became the first woman to receive the IDSA Personal Recognition Award, for her commitment to the design profession and her “major contribut[ions] to its long-term welfare and importance.”Spoon from the Oneida Ltd. Omni line, from 1975. The Museum of Modern Art acquired the Omni line for its collection in 1979. Dover flatware line designed by Manderfield for Oneida Ltd. in 1968Drawing for a teaspoon, 1972. Ellen Manderfield Collection, Syracuse University LibrariesFlatware drawing study from the archives of Oneida Ltd., 1984Ornament study by Manderfield from the archives of Oneida Ltd. This was the latest installment of our Designing Women series. Previously, we profiled the little-known Japanese designer Hisako Watanabe.

SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers

H&D Portfolio showcases the 100 Top Designers in several markets to help you find the right architect, interior designer or landscape designer for your next residential project.
With a regional focus in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia; Texas; and Southern California, H&D Portfolio presents a wide range of styles and design profiles to connect you with top professionals who can help you create the home of your dreams.

FIND A TOP DESIGNER

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Floating timber slabs create layered walls within New York shoe store by Jordana Maisie

Australian designer Jordana Maisie has created a Manhattan boutique for upscale shoe brand Feit that features asymmetrical display areas made of thin sheets of wood (+ slideshow).

The 420-square-foot (39 square metres) shoe store opened in New York's West Village neighbourhood in September.

The design aims to reflect the handcrafted quality of Feit's leather shoes and merge it with a modern and minimal aesthetic, said Maisie, who collaborated with the company's owners, Tull and Josh Price.

"The interior has a unique identity – prioritising process, craft and innovation, while pushing the tension between what is handmade and what is machine made," said Maisie, who is from Australia but now based in Brooklyn.

The shop "has a clean aesthetic featuring geometric shapes created by volume and void," she added.

The linear space features a labyrinthine composition of floor-to-ceiling wooden forms, with openings that provide sight lines between the interior and the street.

Related story: Sneakers are displayed on bleachers in Seattle boutique by Best Practice ArchitectureSimilar to the process of shaping leather, the design team used moulds to carve out display shelves from blocks of timber during the 3D-modelling stage.

The shelving components, made of Baltic birch plywood, were cut using a computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine. They were formed into modules and then delivered to the store.
"Each unique shape was CNC cut, hand sanded and assembled into modules offsite by the fabrication team, which enabled a complex build sequence to unroll on site," said Maisie.

Embedded within the wooden shelving units are white LEDs that brighten and dim in accordance with the seasons. Carefully placed mirrors help visually expand the room.

"Both the architectural and lighting design play with your perception of depth, as you try to distinguish where the boundaries within the space lie," said Maisie.
The design team has named the space Installation Two: Volume and Void.

This is Feit's second store in New York. The other, which opened in 2014 in Nolita, was also designed in collaboration with Maisie and features large slabs of natural wood.

Related story: 30,000 red shoelaces hang from the ceiling of Melbourne's Camper storeDescribed as an "innovator in the neo-luxury movement," Feit produces high-end boots, sneakers, and dress shoes for men and women, along with a small line of accessories. Its products are made of all-natural, non-synthetic materials.

Feit was founded by brothers Tull and Josh Price. Tull is known for starting the cult sneaker brand Royal Elastics, which he launched in 1996 and sold in 2002.

Maisie is an Australian installation artist who creates interactive and sculptural designs. Her work has been exhibited in galleries, museums and festivals throughout Australia, as well in select countries around the world. The Feit flagship store in Nolita was her first project in New York.
She currently is pursuing a master's degree in architecture and an MFA in lighting design at Parsons: The New School for Design.

Other recent shoe boutiques include an austere shop in Seattle by Best Practice Architecture, a children's shoe store in Barcelona by Nábito, and a pop-up shop for Camper in Germany by Diébédo Francis Kere.
Photography is by Naho Kubota.
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SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers

H&D Portfolio showcases the 100 Top Designers in several markets to help you find the right architect, interior designer or landscape designer for your next residential project.
With a regional focus in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia; Texas; and Southern California, H&D Portfolio presents a wide range of styles and design profiles to connect you with top professionals who can help you create the home of your dreams.

FIND A TOP DESIGNER

The post SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers appeared first on Home & Design Magazine.

SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers

H&D Portfolio showcases the 100 Top Designers in several markets to help you find the right architect, interior designer or landscape designer for your next residential project.
With a regional focus in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia; Texas; and Southern California, H&D Portfolio presents a wide range of styles and design profiles to connect you with top professionals who can help you create the home of your dreams.

FIND A TOP DESIGNER

The post SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers appeared first on Home & Design Magazine.

Crazy Fast Drawing Skills That are Totally Opposite from ID Sketching

Generally speaking, industrial design sketching is fast and loose. You start with a rough idea, put pen or pencil to paper with expressive, fluid marks and start to find the form on the page. Traditional instruction dictates that we draw the entire form, including what the viewer cannot see if it were a photograph; for instance, if sketching a 3/4 shot of a car, you still draw all four sides, even if the far parts will later be obscured by fresh linework. And you typically go from big to small; if sketching sneakers for example, you start with the general shape and sole, and the eyelets for the laces come last.Those of us trained in this ID style are bound to find Kim Jung Gi's drawing method bewildering. The South Korean artist "has the ability to visualize the drawing before making his marks," according to the bio on his website. What this means is that if drawing a car, for instance, he can start with the headlight, jump to the C-pillar, add the rearview mirror, etc. He does not find the form on the page, but appears to transcribe it from some spiritual source, and no marks are made unless they would be directly visible to the viewer. If you're not sure what I mean, check out this demonstration, and prepare to have your mind blown:Never mind that there's not a single perspective or contour line—did you see the way he bounces around the page, completely detailing one small item, then moving on to another small item on totally different part of the drawing? Who the hell draws like that? Who the hell can draw like that?This week Kim launches his first solo U.S. exhibition at the Art Whino Gallery in Washington, D.C. For those of you in the New York area, he'll be appearing next month at New York Comic Con in the North Pavilion L4's "Artist Alley."