England

Modern-Day Small-Batch Hybrid Production Techniques: Combining CNC with Hand Tools for Effective Results

When Tom Blake was designing his revolutionary surfboard in the 1920s, I'm sure he had no notion that it would change surfing. Nor could he have any idea that his design would eventually be usurped by foam and plastic. Nor could he have possibly envisioned that nearly a century later, a small shop would go back to wood and produce new designs inspired by his, and that this shop would not be located in his stomping grounds of Hawaii or California, but way over in England.Cornwall-based Otter Surfboards produces Blake-inspired hollow surfboards, featuring a skeleton with sturdy ribs that nevertheless might have appeared shockingly thin to Blake. To adhere the rails and surfaces they use adhesives with efficacies Blake could only have dreamt of. And while he'd recognize some of the hand tools Otter uses, the CNC mill would likely throw him for a loop. Check out the hybrid techniques they use to put their boards together:This will sound naïve to those of you familiar with the usage of Japanese hand tools, but I was amazed at how he used a ryoba to cut curves. I have so much trouble getting the flexible blade to cut straight, it never even occurred to me that you could intentionally bend it and cut without binding.I do wish the video was edited a bit less; I would've liked to see more footage of how he built up and contoured the rails during that time jump between 2:36 and 2:44.For those of you within proximity to Cornwall—perhaps you're headed to see boatmaker Ben Harris?—the chaps at Otter offer workshops ranging from one to five days in length, where you can learn to build surfboards, bellyboards or handplanes (the swimming kind, not the wood-shaving kind). Click here to see more of their stuff.

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House in an old Barcelona dairy has new spaces inserted around its original structure

Architects Lluís Corbella and Marc Mazeres have converted a former dairy in Barcelona into a loft-style house featuring a suspended walkway and glass walls (+ slideshow).

The building located in Barcelona's Gracia district was constructed in 1934 and comprised a barn and an adjacent shop selling products made using milk from cows that lived on site.
The dairy ceased activity in 1984 following the introduction of legislation that outlawed the presence of livestock in the inner city, although the shop remained.

The dairy gradually fell into a state of disrepair, until French architect Marc Mazeres purchased it and asked local architect Lluís Corbella to help him fulfil his vision of converting it into a home for his family.

Extensive renovations were required to stabilise the structure, whilst ensuring the original facades and roof could be retained. The interior was completely gutted, but a brick pillar at the centre that supports the roof was kept and restored.

"The preservation of the original features has always been an important part of the new project," Corbella told Dezeen. "We tried to free these elements visually to give them an important presence in the project."

Within the cavernous space created by removing the existing first floor, the architects inserted metal beams and concrete slabs to support new volumes that form a series of interconnected rooms.

"We wanted to turn the building into a family home with three distinct spaces, lots of natural light, large volumes and huge openings," Corbella explained. "The aim was to create one space for the three teenage sons, one for the parents and a third one being the link between parents and children."

Related story: Graux & Baeyens uses curved walls to convert a factory loft into a family homeVoids between the various additions ensure the central area is visually and physically connected to the rest of the house, whilst helping to retain a sense of the building's original proportions.

The brick column and the timber beam that extends from either side of it dominate the main living area, where some of the original ceiling beams were also reused.

Large windows fill the central space with natural light, which is able to reach other parts of the house thanks to the double-height atrium and glazed internal partitions. The ground-floor windows open onto a walled terrace incorporating a small pool and outdoor dining area.

Internal partitions are constructed from brick covered in prefabricated plastered panels, which provide durable surfaces with good acoustic insulation and helped to reduce the on-site construction period.

The interior features numerous items aimed at creating a fun and lively environment for the family's sons. A hanging chair is suspended from one of the wooden ceiling beams and an old pinball machine stands beside the brick pillar.
A table-tennis table is located on a decked roof overlooking the surrounding rooftops, which can be reached by ascending a folded metal staircase.

Other agricultural buildings that have been converted for residential use include an old cattle shed in the Slovenian Alps that is now a two-storey holiday cabin and a barn in England with a loft bedroom accessible from a staircase hidden behind a cupboard door.
Photography is by Lluís Corbella and Eva Cotman.
Ground floor plan – click for larger imageFirst floor plan – click for larger imageSection one – click for larger imageSection two – click for larger imageThe post House in an old Barcelona dairy has new spaces inserted around its original structure appeared first on Dezeen.

SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers

H&D Portfolio showcases the 100 Top Designers in several markets to help you find the right architect, interior designer or landscape designer for your next residential project.
With a regional focus in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia; Texas; and Southern California, H&D Portfolio presents a wide range of styles and design profiles to connect you with top professionals who can help you create the home of your dreams.

FIND A TOP DESIGNER

The post SEARCH H&D’s Portfolio of 100 Top Designers appeared first on Home & Design Magazine.