Concrete home by Takuro Yamamoto Architects overlooks an allotment and woods near Tokyo

A bright orange wall screens a staircase that leads to a bathroom on top of this concrete house in Tokyo by Takuro Yamamoto Architects (+ slideshow).

The family house, named H-Orange, sits on a narrow plot between another home and the perimeter wall of a small field filled with allotments.
To provide a degree of privacy for the residents, the Tokyo firm directed a windowless wall towards the neighbouring building and arranged openings primarily along its western side.

Glazed living spaces are positioned on the first floor of the building to benefit from views over the top of the brick perimeter wall to the allotments and woods beyond.

Like the firm's Little House Big Terrace, H-Orange features a large patio that supplies the family with private outdoor space on the first floor. This takes the form of an L-shaped terrace that wraps around the exposed-concrete lounge and dining area.

"To emphasise the scene of the woods and big blue sky above the field, the west side of the first floor is widely opened with horizontal windows, and a large open-air terrace," explained the studio.

Related story: White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects"But the view of the field itself is not really beautiful because it was insensitively walled by bricks and these walls seemed to give closed feeling of the place."

The solution was to add a 12-metre-long tilted beam along the front of the terrace, blocking views of the offending wall below and also increasing the privacy of the house.

The beam tilts outwards, with a long narrow gap along the base to maximise the amount of natural light that reaches the terrace.

"An ordinary vertical low wall is enough for these purposes, but such kind of wall would make the open-air terrace dark and harm the spacious feeling," said the architects. "The "tilt beam" is lifted slightly above the floor to form a slit of light and tilted outwards to make the surface of the beam brighter with sunshine."

"The height of the 'tilt beam' was carefully decided to cut off the lower half of the scene from inside, and so the views from the terrace and the living room consist only of pure blue sky and green woods, and the open-air feeling of the house is emphasised."

A timber staircase that links the ground floor garage and bedrooms with the lounge and bathroom above is hidden behind a slab of orange-painted concrete.

The stairs rise through an atrium above the lounge to the bathroom, which is located on a small second storey. Here, picture windows and skylights are positioned to take advantage of the views.
Site plan – click for larger imageGround floor plan – click for larger imageFirst floor plan – click for larger imageFirst floor – click for larger imageSection – click for larger imageThe post Concrete home by Takuro Yamamoto Architects overlooks an allotment and woods near Tokyo appeared first on Dezeen.

A bright orange wall screens a staircase that leads to a bathroom on top of this concrete house in Tokyo by Takuro Yamamoto Architects (+ slideshow).

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

The family house, named H-Orange, sits on a narrow plot between another home and the perimeter wall of a small field filled with allotments.

To provide a degree of privacy for the residents, the Tokyo firm directed a windowless wall towards the neighbouring building and arranged openings primarily along its western side.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

Glazed living spaces are positioned on the first floor of the building to benefit from views over the top of the brick perimeter wall to the allotments and woods beyond.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

Like the firm's Little House Big Terrace, H-Orange features a large patio that supplies the family with private outdoor space on the first floor. This takes the form of an L-shaped terrace that wraps around the exposed-concrete lounge and dining area.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

"To emphasise the scene of the woods and big blue sky above the field, the west side of the first floor is widely opened with horizontal windows, and a large open-air terrace," explained the studio.

Related story: White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

"But the view of the field itself is not really beautiful because it was insensitively walled by bricks and these walls seemed to give closed feeling of the place."

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

The solution was to add a 12-metre-long tilted beam along the front of the terrace, blocking views of the offending wall below and also increasing the privacy of the house.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

The beam tilts outwards, with a long narrow gap along the base to maximise the amount of natural light that reaches the terrace.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

"An ordinary vertical low wall is enough for these purposes, but such kind of wall would make the open-air terrace dark and harm the spacious feeling," said the architects. "The "tilt beam" is lifted slightly above the floor to form a slit of light and tilted outwards to make the surface of the beam brighter with sunshine."

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

"The height of the 'tilt beam' was carefully decided to cut off the lower half of the scene from inside, and so the views from the terrace and the living room consist only of pure blue sky and green woods, and the open-air feeling of the house is emphasised."

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

A timber staircase that links the ground floor garage and bedrooms with the lounge and bathroom above is hidden behind a slab of orange-painted concrete.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto

The stairs rise through an atrium above the lounge to the bathroom, which is located on a small second storey. Here, picture windows and skylights are positioned to take advantage of the views.

H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto
Site plan – click for larger image
H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto
First floor plan – click for larger image
H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto
First floor – click for larger image
H-Orange by Takuro Yamamoto
Section – click for larger image

The post Concrete home by Takuro Yamamoto Architects overlooks an allotment and woods near Tokyo appeared first on Dezeen.

Read more at Dezeen 

Related News
Angular black walls fold around SRK home in Tokyo by ARTechnic Architects
Black textured walls give this seemingly windowless Tokyo residence by ARTechnic Architects a bunker-like appearance (+ slideshow).Tokyo-based ARTechnic Architects designed SRK house on a steeply sloping site in the city's ...
READ MORE
Gabled townhouse in Tokyo by Niji Architects is clad in strips of white steel
Japanese studio Niji Architects has squeezed two homes into its Town House in Takaban, which features a steeply pitched roof, windowless gables and strips of horizontal steel cladding (+ slideshow).The ...
READ MORE
Pitsou Kedem uses board-marked concrete, glass and steel for Modernist-inspired home in Tel Aviv
Israeli studio Pitsou Kedem has completed a family residence in Tel Aviv, using a cantilevered concrete box and glass walls to create a building that "corresponds with the Modernism of ...
READ MORE
Day House by Paul Archer Design is a zinc-clad home slotted into an existing London terrace
This zinc-clad mews house in London by Paul Archer Design looks like a two-storey home from the front, but actually contains four storeys inside (+ slideshow).Day House by Paul Archer ...
READ MORE
Angular black walls fold around SRK home in
Gabled townhouse in Tokyo by Niji Architects is
Pitsou Kedem uses board-marked concrete, glass and steel
Day House by Paul Archer Design is a

Share Button

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.