2015 Dyson Award Finalist Faves: A Clever Way to Carry Clean Water in a Dirty Oil Can

We're pleased to see that design students around the world are killing it! This year's James Dyson Award received a record 710 entries, and the judges have finally whittled them down to 20 finalists, released today. We're going to show you some of our faves.First up is Chloe Louisin, an Industrial Design student at France's Strate École de Design. On a humanitarian mission to Togo and a trip to the Congo with Doctors Without Borders, Louisin saw firsthand how difficult it is for folks in those places to obtain clean water. They often have to travel far to get it, and the most readily available vessels they can use to tote it are old plastic jerrycans formerly used to carry oil or gasoline.The jerrycans are ergonomically sound. They have handles for carrying and are robust enough to survive the journey. They're also readily available. However, the petrol and bacteria within the containers contaminates the water.Louisin's clever solution, the Wat'bag, was inspired by "bag in a box" wine. She developed a sterile plastic pouch, with its own neck and cap, that the user inserts into the jerrycan. They then simply fill the plastic bag, and the water inside is kept clean and separate from the dirty insides of the container.Whether or not Louisin wins a JDA, she's already achieved something very important: Doctors Without Borders has chosen to develop the Wat'bag. Congratulations to Louisin!

We're pleased to see that design students around the world are killing it! This year's James Dyson Award received a record 710 entries, and the judges have finally whittled them down to 20 finalists, released today. We're going to show you some of our faves.

First up is Chloe Louisin, an Industrial Design student at France's Strate École de Design. On a humanitarian mission to Togo and a trip to the Congo with Doctors Without Borders, Louisin saw firsthand how difficult it is for folks in those places to obtain clean water. They often have to travel far to get it, and the most readily available vessels they can use to tote it are old plastic jerrycans formerly used to carry oil or gasoline.

The jerrycans are ergonomically sound. They have handles for carrying and are robust enough to survive the journey. They're also readily available. However, the petrol and bacteria within the containers contaminates the water.

Louisin's clever solution, the Wat'bag, was inspired by "bag in a box" wine. She developed a sterile plastic pouch, with its own neck and cap, that the user inserts into the jerrycan. They then simply fill the plastic bag, and the water inside is kept clean and separate from the dirty insides of the container.

Whether or not Louisin wins a JDA, she's already achieved something very important: Doctors Without Borders has chosen to develop the Wat'bag. Congratulations to Louisin!

Read more at Core77 

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